What does 'being fit' look like?

4 ways to help you approach fitness in more reasonable way

How many images of 'fit' people have you seen in last 24 hours?

I bet it's close to a gazillion.

You just have to look at Instagram, supplement adverts, gym promotions, the front cover of fitness magazines, even when you watch a superhero movie. All the images you see of 'fit' people are those with abs, broad shoulders, defined muscles, perfect skin etc...

It's no wonder we believe that in order to be considered fit, we have to look a certain way.

But are these images a true reflection of what fit looks like?

The answer is quiet simple... NO!

These images represent such an incredibly narrow view of what fitness actually is.

Defining fitness by a look is quite possibly the single most psychologically damaging influence over our personal body image. And it can influences our approach to fitness in a very negative way.

Fitness does not have a 'look'! And you should never define your own level of fitness by the way you look.

Fitness is a much broader term compared to how the media perceive it to be.

So with that said here is my attempt to help you redefine what it means to be fit.

And more to the point try to help you define what being fit means to you.

#1 Personal Wins

On a weekly basis we have clients achieving incredible personal breakthroughs. Such as completing their first ever gym session, running 2km without stopping, completing 1 full press up, losing 1/2 a pound of body fat, maintaining their body weight for the last 6 months. However, just because these clients do not necessarily 'look' like the 'fit' images we are bombarded with they somehow do not feel deserving of their accomplishments. So the next time you achieve a win do not compare that accomplishment to anyone else. That win is all yours. Be proud of it and use it to formulated lasting healthy habits.

#2 Be proud of being 'normal'

Beer, wine, chocolate, cake, late night parties... We all enjoy things that are not conducive to six pack abs or a ripped physique but that's okay. In fact it's better than okay. It's an essential part of you and your level of fitness. In truth in order to look shredded you have to put in a serious shift, restrict pretty much everything that tastes nice, stop doing everything that is fun, train like a professional athlete 7 days per week and have no social life. Not many people want to live that way. So don't! Find a way to blend a little bit of what you fancy with healthy habits that work according to the life you want to live.

#3 Personal accomplishment

The way you define fitness for you is completely different to the way others define fitness for themselves. Fitness is about personal accomplishment which could be to progress, maintain or even minimise the decline as you age for example. The idea of 'looking fit' does not exist. So stop focusing on looking fit and instead focus on being fit. Apply healthy habits that work for you and try to completely remove all the pressure that comes with comparing how you look to someone else.

#4 No one cares

Well this is not strictly true. People do care about you but the people that you think might be judging you for how you 'look' care much more about the way they 'look' to notice. Shift all your focus to consistent daily habits that work for you. Attach new habits you're trying to adopt to ones you currently have and do not give a second thought to how people perceive you and your level of fitness. It's not worth your attention!

To summarise fitness does not have a look. Make fitness a part of your routine. Do not work towards a level of fitness you think might impress someone else - no one cares and those that do care don't care how you look. Focus on being fit not looking fit.

I hope this has helped you think differently as to what fitness means to you so you can approach it in a much more realistic, rational and stress free way.

See you soon,

Matt

PS. If you are new to FITISM, ready to get in shape and would like our help click the button below.

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